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Listener posts 5 Star Review of the audiobook HOUSE CALL on audible.com



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    5 out of 5 stars

 Did not disappoint! 

I read Darden North’s first novel, “House Call,” when it was first published and have enjoyed his other novels since. Recently, I’ve gotten into listening to audiobooks on my drive to and from work, so I was thrilled to see that “House Call” had just come out—and I was not disappointed. Narrator Michael Robbins nailed it with his southern dialect and portrayal of the unique characters. Robbins could pass for a Mississippi native! His versatility as an actor came through with other character dialects as well. The narrator added to the professional performance by including an occasional sound effect and a few seconds of introductory and closing music. For me, it was like listening to a movie or play. Now, I feel like I truly know Darden North’s characters in “House Call”: the haughty Dr. Aslyn Hawes; the self-confident but still naïve Dr. Cullen Gwinn and his society-drenched, spoiled wife Madelyn; Jimmy the great-looking ambulance driver, and nurse Taylor Richards whose murder sets the stage for this well-plotted, one-of-a-kind mystery—a story with an ending that no one sees coming. 

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