Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2014

Sometimes fiction authors have to tell the truth

Sometimes fiction writers have to get serious, even if they are known for writing murder mysteries. When I mentioned the issue of night-time and early morning pedestrian safety to the director of our neighborhood homeowner's association, I was asked to address the problem in an article for the neighborhood magazine! (Surprised?) I hope you'll take a moment to go to the online link that follows, scroll to page 26 for the article, and find the discussion about neighborhood safety enlightening. And as far as walking and jogging goes in Jackson, Mississippi, you just don't do much of it when you sit in front of a laptop typing...
http://legacy.n2pub.com/newsletter/files/MS_Madison/Eastover/2014/Eastover_Dec14.pdf


Darden North reviews "Natchez Burning" by Greg Iles

Darden North reviews "Seal of the King" by Ralph Smith

Seal of the King by Ralph Smith
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

In the early 1800s, Samuel Taylor Coleridge defined skilled fantasy as writing to “invoke a willing suspension of disbelief.” The premier installment of the “Seal of the King” Christian fantasy series by Ralph Smith does just that—masterfully weaving human decency and truth into a tale of supernatural deceit and evil.

At the first crackle of air and explosion of light, David finally meets his beautiful Aurora, a young woman who is as appealing as she is a fierce warrior, an expert in archery with deadly aim (and reminiscent of Katniss Everdeen of “The Hunger Games”).  David, a handsome young man, a simple farmer left alone after his parents’ mysterious fiery car accident, has dreamed of Aurora as she has dreamed of him. But it is when they share an iron clad bond of determination to find and destroy the Dark One that David’s true physical strength emerges: Simple as slicing butter with a knife, the guy can wield a dagger with dec…

Short Excerpt of "Wiggle Room," fourth novel by Darden North (Sartoris Literary, June 2013)

Shards of asphalt ripped the barricade against the thin-walled trailer, throwing Brad from his bunk and a near-comatose sleep. He scrambled for his watch as the burst of sandbags outside pre-empted the claxon’s late warning. Another mortar shell erupted on the pavement, the sound muffled by a voice from the radio: Your butt OK? Better be, ’cause I need it, or there won’t be anything alive to transport outta here tonight. “Damn, Elizabeth, I think that makes number 38, doesn’t it? Thank God for that wall,” Brad said. “Enemy’s been busy, Major. But this one’s over, gotta be. And, like I said, I need you here at the hospital.”  Brad sat up on the bare floor, leaning his head against the bed, still below the level of the sandbag barrier outside. Another look at his watch: he was due two hours of daylight sleep, and last night’s flight transporting military patients had drained him. “Come on, it’s only 3:00 PM, Cossar, and I was down pretty hard.” “But that’s why you doctors make the b…

Five Star review of the audio version of award-winning "Points of Origin" by Darden North

This review was posted on audible.com 07/11/2014 by a  listener to  the audio version of "Points of Origin" and is reprinted in its entirety:
07-11-14 Overall Performance Story "An intriguing, multi-level story brought to life" Any additional comments? This book is hard to categorize, but it definitely kept my interest throughout. It is not really a mystery, though a lot of mysteries unfold. It is not really a romance, though several romances are central to it. It is not really a thriller, though it is full of excitement and twists and turns. It is the story of numerous lives in a small Southern town, that interconnect through various twists of fate, with each ripple

Audiobook version of "Points of Origin" by Darden North now available on audible.com, iTunes, and Amazon

Points of Origin
Small southern towns are not always sleepy—particularly in Larkspur, Mississippi, where homes burst into flames and lives crumble. It is the suspicious death of a young woman that costs premiere plastic surgeon Dan Foxworth his surgical dynasty, his life, and that of his wife. Devastated by the loss of both parents and unable to meet a bitter grandfather's expectations, Sher Foxworth tries to save an elderly woman from her burning home. Suddenly the accidental hero, his life is turned upside down by disturbing twists of fate. To dig his way out, Sher makes a deal to wear a fireman’s hat and remains the hero. But it is the philandering, wealthy trial lawyer Cordell Pixler who collects the enemies. Many in the boiling southern town seek revenge against Pixler—some because of sex and some because of money—and it’s a race to see who nails him first. 
“Points of Origin” was awarded nationally in Southern Fiction by the Independent Publisher (IPPY) Book Awards and is the …

Darden North's review of "Blood Line" by James Rollins

's review
Apr 26, 14 · edit
4 of 5 stars Read from March 24 to April 26, 2014
I had the pleasure of meeting the author James Rollins at a ThrillerFest Writers Conference a couple of years ago in New York. He introduced author Robin Cook as the ThrillerMaster of the annual event. Jim signed my purchased copy of his then current novel "The Doomsday Key." Another Sigma Force novel, "Blood Line" is back with Director Painter and his team of highly trained male and female operatives who at times seem just plan lucky. While some of the fertility science in "Blood Line" has been included in other works (namely "Fresh Frozen" by yours truly), Rollins exploits the technology into elements of what we hope is only science fiction. Weaving in bibilical history, he reveals how humanity can take a second to the advancement of science, power, and domination. While the constant mind-bending action and character flips can be exhausting at times, Ro…

Day Tour of Library Book Clubs - National Library Week 2014

I had the privilege to celebrate this recent National Library Week with a visit to the Union County Library in New Albany, Mississippi. The guest of Luncheon with Books president Anita Buster and former president, my Aunt Marjorie Livingston, I spoke to an enthusiastic group at the monthly book club about my four novels, including a reading from the newest thriller, “Wiggle Room.” A probing question and answer session followed, as well as a book signing, and I enjoyed all of it.  Aunt Marjorie warmly introduced me to the enthusiastic group, supplementing my bio with a few tales from my childhood visits to New Albany. My mother (her sister, Evelyn North) made the trip with me, and my cousins Nancy, Steve, and Patsy were in the audience as well. We had a great visit and lunch downtown, and I appreciate the hospitality and invitation. The day trip home to Jackson included a visit to the Drew (MS) Library Book Club at the invitation of Diane Shurden. Likewise, I was grateful to be included…

Darden North reviews "The Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt

My review of "The Goldfinch" appears in print and online in the January 25, 2014 edition of "The Clarion Ledger." For this reader, absorbing Donna Tartt's newest novel is a step away from the thrillers I write and typically enjoy.

Authors who review the work of other authors are said to help all concerned. 

"The Goldfinch" is a opportunity to indulge in a rather lengthy, but beautifully written, work of literary fiction.

http://www.clarionledger.com/article/20140126/FEAT/301260058/Book-review-Goldfinch-both-complex-dark

----- Darden North is the IPPY-award winning author of four novels and murder mysteries, most recently "Wiggle Room."

Author Darden North reviews "Gone Girl," a novel by Gillian Flynn

A five-star review is often defined as amazing. "Gone Girl," a novel by Gillian Flynn, is indeed amazing, mostly because of the amazing Amy Elliott Dunne.

The mark of an intense, imaginative author (Some reviewers call Flynn creepy) is that she has the mastery to make the reader either strongly like or dislike a character. Strong character development does not turn up lukewarm; it has to be either hot or cold. This reader took an immediate dislike to the selfish, manipulative Amy Elliott Dunn, Nick Dunne's antagonist, his wife of five years.

I would nominate Amy as one of the coldest females in modern fiction, and, perhaps, the cheating Nick as one of the most vulnerable, flawed males. To me, what is truly remarkable about storytelling (and maybe real life) is that some may disagree and consider Amy Elliott Dunne the hero.

The work is written in first-person and told almost tit-for-tat by Amy and Nick. It includes enough foreshadowing and foreboding to make the unexpected p…