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POINTS OF ORIGIN reviewed by author Martha A. Cheves

***** Points of Origin - Reviewed by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat July 14, 2009

"Great ending!"

'Cordell Pixler, Esquire, had a new wife, his fourth... Anyone who already knew the latest Mrs.Cordell Pixler, or subsequently met her, thought her more attractive and definitely much younger than her attorney husband. Much to his chagrin, Pixler had not been persuasive enough to coax his voluptuous bride to move permanently into the mortgage-free home, the one his third wife insisted he buy and remodel extensively several years before his third divorce... Rachel Pixler wanted a brand new house... Furthermore it would have to be located in the most exclusive area of Larkspur, that being Manorwood Heights.'

Cordell Pixler obtained his money through the destruction of others. When Flowers Ridley's mother Charity decided Flowers needed "adjustments" to bring her inner beauty to the surface she went to the best plastic surgeon around, Sheridan Smith Foxworth, Jr. And when her daughter later died from blood clots she again went to the best plaintiff’s lawyer who was Pixler. Unknown to Charity, her decision to sue Foxworth would end up causing a snowball effect destroying many. One person who feels the effects the most is Sheridan (Sher)Foxworth, III who will loose both of his parents and give up his dreams to follow in his father's footsteps by failing to become a doctor himself. Instead he becomes a firefighter.

Wayne Simmons was a high school classmate of Sher and he loves to "create" fires. But not just any kind of fire. His fires appear to be of natural or neglect causes. Plus he's for hire. So when a fire occurs in Manorwood Heights killing the owner, was it accidental or intentional? Was Simmons involved and if so who hired him? One thing for sure is that Pixler wasted no time in buying the property.

Hobby Dencil is one of the best architects around and will become involved in the "Pixler Snowball" as he designs the perfect house for Rachel. Just days before construction is to start Rachel makes a few changes of her own to the plans causing Hobby to start from scratch with his drawing with the ending being a structure he really didn't want his own name associated with.

In the process of building Rachel's "palace" Pixler ends up angering half the community. So when the house burns during a charity party, was it an accident or was it planned? Could the Real Estate agent undercut by Pixler in the purchase of the property have set something up? Or the female police officer who enjoyed going after the "rich and famous?" Or maybe even Sheridan Smith Foxworth, Sr. for destroying his family?

I will give you a clue. North has done it again.
The ending was a total shock to me.

Reviewer: Martha A. Cheves
Location: Charlotte, NC

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